Stop waiting for permission

I’ve always written. But I haven’t always called myself a writer.

 

Somehow, it felt like a title that had to be bestowed by someone else. As though as some point I would reach some kind of indeterminate level of professionalism which would qualify me to actually ‘be’ what I doing. I had already had a few freelance jobs, so I knew people were willing to pay me for working with words, but still, in my mind, that wasn’t enough. Surely there was some official signifier that I hadn’t hit yet.

Except that no-one actually does ever tell you you’re a writer. And so one day, I just decided. I ordered some business cards, and right underneath my name, I had them put one word –

Why your creativity matters

Everybody has gifts.

Some of our gifts get more external validation, and therefore develop more naturally. Gifts to do with the ability to make a sale, plan a project, or generate enthusiasm around an initiative or brand will generally find plenty of outlet and affirmation in a variety of fields of work.

But not all gifts shine as easily in everyday life. This is especially true with gifts to do with the arts.

The TRIP Principle

By Daniel Gibney

This is a guest post from my friend Daniel Gibney, a professional drummer and entrepreneur. After being unable to find appropriate hearing protection for his two little girls to be around him when he was playing drums, he founded¬†Em’s for Kids, a now-international company specialising in hearing protection earmuffs for children and babies. You can follow Daniel on Twitter or Instagram¬†or check out Em’s for Kids on Facebook or Instagram.

Apart from business, one of my main passions in life is playing the drums. I’ve been very blessed over the years to work as a drummer in a professional capacity, and it’s something I still do. The TRIP principle is something I developed as a drummer, but it’s even more applicable in business and life in general.